New Book: Pincushions to Sew


Pincushions to Sew Leisure Arts Edie EckmanThis post may contain affiliate links.

Surprise! I’ve written a sewing book! Pincushions to Sew, from Leisure Arts, features 15 pincushions designed by yours truly.

These were great fun to make, and I had a blast thinking of ways to embellish them. And since I’m only an intermediate sewer myself, I can guarantee that the sewing skill needed is “not that much”.

Why Pincushions?

Pincushions to Sew Prairie Points

 

  • They are quick to make. I was amazed at how quickly I finished these, compared to a knitting project!
  • They offer the perfect opportunity to practice your sewing skills. I learned to make Prairie Points just for this book.
  • It’s a great way to use small amounts of fabric. Each of these uses only 5″ charm squares or jelly roll strips, in coordinating prints and colors.
  • You can embellish them using all kinds of fun ribbons and other trims. What a terrific excuse for another trip to the store to get more doo-dads!
  • The finished product is completely utilitarian. You can always use another pincushion.
  • They make great gifts for your crafty friends.

Pincushions to Sew_PyramidHere’s what the promo copy says:

You can never have too many pincushions, and with Pincushions to Sew from Leisure Arts, you can feed that need! Beginners can master the Stacked Pincushion and the trim-enhanced Trio, which features three ways to decorate a square with ribbon and mini ball fringe. The Log Cable and Tufted designs are favorites in modern prints. More experienced sewers will delight in making the Pleated and flower-like Prairie Points pincushions. Everyone can practice their simple embroidery skill with Layered Squares. Additional designed inlcude Wrist, Round, Pyramid, Cube, Pocket, Rickrack, Hexagon, and Sewing Machine. Step-by-step instructions and patterns give you all the help you need to create these 15 charming projects by Edie Eckman.


But I’m a crocheter/knitter/weaver. Why do I need a pincushion?

Take a look at this fairly unattractive close-up of my desk**.  What you are seeing are two prototype pincushions being used front and center in my main work space. I am constantly reaching for a pin or a stitch marker, and these make it possible to keep what I need at hand. I’ve also go a pincushion next to my spot on the sofa in front of the TV, and in my bedroom, and in the guest room…

I really should make a cuter one for my desk, now that I’ve perfected the patterns.


What does Edie know about sewing?

I’m not surprised you asked, since you know me as a crocheter and knitter. Well, I sewed my first dress in elementary school, and a Gunne Sax-inspired prom dress in high school. That’s me, age 11, in a dress I made myself. Isn’t that mushroom fabric groovy?

In the ensuing years, I have made kids’ clothes, and countless curtains and home dec projects. However, I am not a quilter. Yet.

I hope you’ll enjoy Pincushions to Sew. And if you make any of the pincushions, please share a photo on my social media!

 

 

**Believe me, you don’t want to see the whole desk right now.


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2 thoughts on “New Book: Pincushions to Sew

  • Angie Strickland Simpson

    I had a mushroom print smock top that my mother made. I still have some of that fabric in a quilt-style pillow cover I made from her scraps. Yes, every home needs a couple of pincushions, at least.

  • Edie Eckman Post author

    Angie, you and I are the same “vintage”, so it’s not surprising that we had mushroom fabrics. They were all the rage for a year or two.