The Lonely Doll Knits a Scarf

Recently I discovered something that made me very happy: The Lonely Doll books are still in print. These picture books by Dare Wright were my favorite stories oh-so-many years ago. After all, the eponymous Lonely Doll is named Edith, and we Ediths have to stick together.

Of the several Lonely Doll books that I owned, my most favorite was A Gift from The Lonely Doll, in which Edith decides to knit a scarf for her friend, Mr. Bear. Because she wants to keep the gift a secret, she keeps the scarf hidden in a basket. There’s a not-so-surprise ending, but I won’t be responsible for spoilers. You’ll have to read the book yourself!

The Lonely Doll got me thinking about other picture books with good fiber-y content. I’ve rounded up a few titles here.

 

 



Charlie Needs a Cloak
 was especially popular at my house, because we actually had a Charlie.

 

 

 

 

 

I read Amos’s Sweater so many times, I still have parts of it memorized: “Amos was old, and Amos was cold and Amos was tired of giving away all his wool.” He really is a pretty grumpy old guy, but by the end of the story he’s no longer cold. Oops, I promised no spoilers.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Sheep in a Jeep, Sheep Go to Sleep, Sheep in a Shop, Sheep on a Ship (and others!) are classics and provide all the sheep rhymes you can stand. Read all of them and you’ll be dreaming of sheep, for sure.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I haven’t read this one, but can’t resist the rhyme.

 

 

 

 

 Adorable illustrations!

Now it’s your turn. Comment below with your favorite fiber-related picture book. I’m off to find a small person who would like to hear a story or two.

Sneak Peek: Crochet One-Skein Wonders for Babies

This post may contain affiliate links, which provide a small income but don’t cost you anything extra.

Wanna see a sneak peek at a few of the designs from Crochet One-Skein Wonders for Babies? Alrighty then! With 101 patterns (at just under 19 cents per pattern), this may be the only baby crochet book you need for quite some time.

Excerpted from Crochet One Skein Wonders for Babies (c) Judith Durant & Edie Eckman. Photographs by (c) Geneve Hoffman Photography. Used with permission of Storey Publishing.

Creativebug’s Mother’s Day Sale

Mother's Day Sale

What Mom really wants this weekend is a day or two off, but if you can’t give her that, give her the next-best thing: some Me Time with her favorite craft! Creativebug has a really great deal on for Mother’s Day, and the cool thing is that you can watch all the Creativebug classes for that price, for an entire year.

That means that you can binge-watch (binge-craft?) to your heart’s delight, anywhere and any time you can find the time.

And Moms, if you don’t get something totally awesome for Mother’s Day, you can still buy something for yourself. You have my permission.

Crochet One-Skein Wonders for Babies

Crochet One Skein Wonders for BabiesCrochet One-Skein Wonders® for Babies is here! Crochet One-Skein Wonders® was such a huge hit that we decided to do another one, this time for wee ones.

I once bought a Phildar pattern book of knitted baby garments. I didn’t have a baby at the time. I didn’t have any friends with babies. I didn’t even know anybody who was pregnant. I simply wanted the book because the models and sweaters were so cute. As time went on, I knit every single sweater in that book, for nieces and nephews, children of friends, and eventually, for my own children. It was my go-to project book for years.

Crochet One-Skein Wonders® for Babies will serve the same purpose. You’ll find adorable projects of every type, suitable for gift-giving at every level: Nearest and Dearest, Children of Close Friends, Children of Co-Workers, Random Strangers, Charity Projects, and OMG-I-Need-A-Quick-Shower-Gift.

As with all the other One-Skein Wonders® books, there are 101 projects, each using just a single ball of yarn. At a retail price of $18.95, that works out to just under 19 cents per pattern!

 

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Crochetville Blog Tour

Free Stitch Dictionary for Crochetville’s National Crochet Month Blog Tour!

Ten Stitches CollageI’m a huge fan of collecting stitch patterns, as well as creating my own. Just take a look at some the crochet books I’ve written, and you’ll get a sense of how much value I give to stitch dictionaries!

As we wrap up Crochetville‘s month-long blog tour for National Crochet Month (AND National Craft Month!),  I’m offering a free mini crochet stitch dictionary which I hope you’ll enjoy. Get it now, because this is a time-limited offer! (SORRY-the time has expired, but please sign up for my newsletter anyway!)

I invite you to sign up for my newsletter so you can hear about my latest adventures in designing and teaching. There will be announcements of new books and online classes coming up very soon, so don’t miss out!

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Skewing Grannies

Not a punk rock band, but a Thing that Happens.

Think of the classic granny square. For four or five rounds, it lies nice and squareish like this pastel square.

But if you keep going for round after round, it may start to look a bit like this blue blanket (which is a rectangle, not a square, but you get the idea).

This is a beautiful blanket but wouldn’t it be even better if it didn’t tilt on its axis? The skewing happens because each stitch sits slightly off center from the stitches above it, and the more rounds you work, the more exaggerated the effect becomes. Luckily there’s a solution.

Every few rounds replace the typical (3 dc, ch 2, 3 dc) granny square corner shown on the left with a (2 dc, ch 2, 4 dc) corner shown on the right.

It won’t be noticeable in the overall design but should re-align the sides. Try it and let me know how it works for you.

Thanks to Raveler nursekimknits for providing such a great example of a Skewing Granny and for reminding me that this is a common problem. Got other problems that need solutions? Leave a comment below.