Learn New Crochet Stitches with the Crochet Stitch Workshop

There’s so much more to crochet than granny squares and ripple stitch! Take your crocheting in a new direction this summer when you learn new crochet stitches in my Crochet Stitch Workshop, a series of online classes.

Each 90-minute video-conference session stands alone, so you can take just the ones you are interested in, or take the whole series. Classes are priced individually.

Where Does it Happen?

It’s all online, so you can be anywhere! Just register for the classes you want, and you’ll get an invitation to the Zoom Meeting.

When Are the Sessions?

Thursdays in July and August

Live interactive streaming sessions take place on Thursdays at 7:00 p.m. Eastern during July and August.

Note that these sessions are not recorded, so you’ll need to be there to participate.

How Does It Work?

You’ll receive a handout with text and charted instructions for several different stitch patterns using the technique. You’ll watch a live-streaming demo of the techniques and the stitch patterns. Then you’ll be able to practice your choice of stitch pattern(s).

I’ll be right there to answer your questions and help you through any trouble spots, just like I would if we in the same room together.

This post contains affiliate links.

Are There Any Prerequisites?

We’ll be using American crochet terminology. You should be familiar and comfortable with the basic crochet stitches: chain, single crochet, half double crochet and double crochet.

You should know how to read a crochet pattern. Understanding symbol crochet diagrams is also helpful, but not required.

Crochet Answer Book 2nd Edition by Edie Eckman
The Crochet Answer Book is a classic pocket reference.

If you need to brush up on your basic crochet skills, check out The Crochet Answer Book by Edie Eckman. Subscribe to Edie’s YouTube channel for video tutorials. Look at Crochet: Basics & Beyond for additional links.

What Stitches Will I Learn?

Topics include:

  • Front Loop & Back Loop Stitches
  • Clusters, Bobbles & Popcorns
  • Puff Stitches
  • Cables
  • Ripples & Chevrons
  • Bullion Stitch
  • Crocodile Stitch

See how easy it is to learn online from an experienced teacher, in the comfort of your favorite chair! Register now!

register button

Still Have Questions?

Ask your questions in the comments below and I’ll do my best to answer.

Crochet Yarn Overs and Yarn Unders: What’s the Difference?

Are you using yarn under graphic

Almost every crochet stitch includes the instruction “yarn over”. But what is a yarn over and how is it different from a yarn under? Does it really make a difference in your crochet?

Yes, it does make a difference. Let me explain. Read all the way to the bottom of the post, then watch the video.

I’m using American crochet terminology.

How to Yarn Over

Start with your hands in the ready position, as shown in the photos. The hook is in front of the working yarn.

Neutral "Ready" position for right hand
Neutral “ready” position for right hand

Your dominant hand holds the hook and your non-dominant hand controls the yarn, with the working yarn coming over your index finger. This means that if you are right-handed, the hook is in your right hand and the yarn in your left. If you are left-handed, the hook is in your left hand and the yarn is in your right.

Neutral "ready" position for left hand
Neutral “ready” position for left hand

Press back with the hook and at the same time bring the yarn over the hook from back to front. The yarn will be crossing the front of the hook from upper right to lower left if you are right-handed, and from upper left to lower right if you are left-handed.

Yarn over for right-handed crocheters
Yarn over for right-handed crocheters
Yarn over for left-handed crocheters
Yarn over for left-handed crocheters

How to Yarn Under

Start in the ready position as described above, but bring the hook over the top of the working yarn, so that the yarn crosses the front of the hook from lower right to upper left for right-handers, or from lower left to upper right for left-handers.

Yarn under for right-handed crocheters
Yarn under for right-handed crocheters
Yarn under for left-handed crocheters
Yarn under for left-handed crocheters

Single Crochet: Yarn Over and Yarn Under

To work a regular single crochet, insert the hook into the stitch, yarn over — notice the position of the yarn — and pull up a loop, then yarn over and pull through two loops on the hook.

Some crocheters work a yarn under instead of a yarn over at a crucial point. Often they don’t even know they are doing a yarn under! Here’s what typically happens:
Insert the hook into the stitch, yarn under — notice the position of the yarn — and pull up a loop, then yarn over and pull through two loops on the hook.

Why Does It Matter?

Take a look at the photo below. In the first few rows, I crocheted a regular single crochet, made with yarn overs. The two legs of these single crochet are parallel to one another.

regular sc compared to crossed sc
The stitch circled in red is crossed, while the stitch circled in green is straight.

Then I switched techniques on the last row. On that row, after I inserted the hook into the stitch, I did a yarn under then finished off the second step with a yarn over. In this example, the two legs of the single crochet are crossed.

The yarn unders create twisted stitches, but they also change the gauge and the drape of the fabric. Chances are, if you’ve been working unintended yarn unders, you’ve been having trouble matching the pattern gauge! Try it yourself and see the difference.

Some people like to use yarn under single crochet stitches for amigurumi projects. That’s fine, as long as it is intentional!

Double Crochet: Yarn Over and Yarn Under

Double crochet has three yarn overs, and thus three opportunities to make yarn unders. However, let’s concentrate on what happens when you do a yarn under right after you insert your hook into the fabric, as above.

Here’s a regular double crochet: Yarn over, insert the hook into the stitch, yarn over and pull up a loop, (yarn over, pull through 2 loops) two times.

See how the legs at the base of the double crochet are parallel?

double crochet with parallel legs made with yarn over
The strands on the base of this double crochet are parallel.

Here’s a twisted double crochet: Yarn over, insert the hook into the stitch, yarn under and pull up a loop, (yarn over, pull through 2 loops) two times.

Twisted double crochet stitches made with yarn under
The base of these double crochets are twisted.

This time, the legs at the base of the double crochet are twisted.

Know the Difference

If you are just learning to crochet, pay attention to the way you are wrapping the yarn over the hook. Get into the habit of checking that you are working a yarn over (unless the pattern says otherwise).

If you have been crocheting for a while and have only just discovered that you are doing unintentional yarn unders, it’s not too late to change!

Take time to study what you have been doing, then practice working yarn overs instead of yarn unders. It may feel strange at first, but you will eventually find that it is easier to get the yarn through the fabric with a yarn over.

Has this post been eye-opening to you? Have you discovered that you were yarn undering when you should have been yarn overing? Let me know in the comments.

The following affiliate links might provide a small income to me if you buy something, but don’t cost you anything extra.

The yarn I’m using in the photos and video is Marly Bird’s Chic Sheep from Red Heart. The crochet hook is Clover Amour, size 5.5 mm.

Keep Learning

Want to know more about crochet? I’ve got resources and links to up your skill level.