Free Knitting Pattern: Star Coasters

star coasters on table

It’s a party any time you use these cute star-shaped coasters! Use them for Independence Day, birthday parties, or holiday decor. They are quick and easy gifts for everyone.

Looking for a beginner project that teaches new skills? Check out the video tutorials below. You’ll increase, decrease, use stitch markers, seam, and weave in ends, but you’ll never have to purl!

Star Coasters by Edie Eckman

The star is made by knitting five separate points first, increasing from the tip of each point toward the center. Then the points are joined and the center of the star is worked back and forth in rows, decreasing toward the center. When the decreases are complete, there is one short seam to sew.

The free knitting pattern is below. You can also purchase a printable ad-free pdf that includes links to the tutorials.

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About the Yarn

Symbol for 4 weight yarn

Each coaster takes just 25-30 yards [23-27 m] of medium-weight yarn. Mix and match colors to increase your stash-busting potential. Or use a bulky wool and large needles to create a pot holder or hot pad!

I used a variety of stash yarns for my samples. The red star pictured is knit from Red Heart Soft (100% acrylic) in color Really Red. I used US size 8 [5 mm] knitting needles.

image of Red Heart Soft yarn in color Really Red

Gauge is always important, but it’s not crucial in this project. As long as you are happy with the fabric you are knitting, a slight variation in size won’t matter.

Knitting Skills Used

This is a perfect project for beginners willing to take on new skills. If you know how to knit (you won’t have to purl), you’re ready for the next step.

The pattern uses the knit front and back increase (kfb), knit 2 together (k2tog) and slip, slip, knit (ssk) decreases. Once you have practiced those, you’ll have a chance to learn the slip2-knit-pass (s2kp) double decrease. You’ll also see how stitch markers are used to mark shaping.

There are video tutorials for the whole thing, so you have plenty of support!

And if you aren’t a beginner? This is a quick, easy and portable project.

Red knitted star coaster

Star Coasters Pattern

Finished Dimensions

Approximately 6″ [15 cm] tip-to-tip

Materials

Worsted Weight Yarn: approximately 30 yds [27 m] of any color desired C. Red sample used Red Heart Soft Yarn (100% acrylic, 5 oz [140 g], 256 yd [234 m]), 1 skein Really Red

US size 8 [5 mm] knitting needle or size to obtain correct gauge; you may choose to knit back and forth on a circular needle .

Stitch markers; tapestry needle

Gauge

20 sts and 18 rows = 4″ [10 cm] in Garter Stitch (knit every row)

Gauge is not crucial in this pattern. If your gauge is different the size of your coaster will also be different, and you may use a different amount of yarn.

Abbreviations

dec: decrease
inc: increase
k: knit
k2tog: knit 2 stitches together
kfb: knit into the front and back of the stitch
pm: place marker
rep: repeat
rnd(s): round(s)
RS: right side
s2kp (slip 2, knit, pass): slip next 2 stitches together knitwise, k1, pass 2 slipped sts over the knit st
ssk (slip, slip, knit): slip next 2 stitches one at a time knitwise, insert left needle into the fronts of these 2 stitches and knit them together through the back loops
st(s): stitch(es)
WS: wrong side

Red, yellow and blue star coasters

Pattern Note

Leave at least a 4” [10 cm] yarn tail to allow enough length for weaving in ends.

Instructions

Star Point (Make 5)

Long tail cast on 3 sts.

Row 1: Knit.

Row 2: [Kfb] 2 times, k1—5 sts.

Rows 3-5: Knit.

Row 6 (Inc Row): Kfb, knit to last 2 sts, kfb, k1—2 sts increased.

Rows 7-9: Knit.

Rep last 4 rows 2 times—11 sts.

Cut yarn; leave sts on needle. On last point, do not cut yarn. You will have 55 sts on your needle. Make sure that each point is arranged with the ending yarn tail on the right edge, ready to work a RS row.

Star Center

Row 1 (Joining Row, RS): [K11, pm] 4 times, knit to end.

Rows 2-3 (Dec Row): [Ssk, knit to 2 sts before marker, k2tog] 4 times, ssk, knit to last 2 sts, k2tog—35 sts.

Row 4: Knit.

Rows 5 and 6: Rep Rows 3 and 4—25 sts.

Row 7: Rep Dec Row—15 sts.

Row 8: Knit, removing markers.

Row 9: [S2kp] across—5 sts.

Row 10: Knit.

Cut yarn, leaving a long tail for sewing. Thread yarn tail through remaining stitches and pull tight. With RS facing, sew open edges of star center together. Weave in ends.

Looking for more easy knitting patterns?

Easy Colorblock Knitted Washcloths (or Dishcloths)

Easy Knitting Colorblock Washcloths-6 designs shown

Whether you use them as dishcloths or as washcloths, knitted squares are a useful and popular project for knitters of all skill levels. Who doesn’t love a beautiful, soft hand-knit cloth to pamper their face, or a cute and sturdy cloth for that thankless chore that is kitchen cleanup?

This collection of six knitted washcloths (or dishcloths) helps you brush up on your knitting skills.  Links to video tutorials help you with unfamiliar techniques. 

Easy Knitting Colorblock Washcloths or Discloths-6 designs shown

With these patterns, knitting garter stitch was never so rewarding! Relax into the meditative rhythm of all-over knit stitches and enjoy the beauty of color. 

Beginning knitters will be comfortable knitting stripes, then progress to knitting on the bias. After that, step up to the joy that is a mitered square. Garter stitch intarsia techniques take you from beginning to intermediate skills in easy steps. There’s no purling needed!

This post contains affiliate links, which help support me but don’t cost you anything extra. Many thanks to Trailhead Yarns, who provided the yarn for this project. 

Easy Knitted Colorblock Washcloths by Edie Eckman- rolled up

The free pattern for the easiest cloth, Team Colors, is presented below. Buy a printable downloadable pdf of all six patterns, and knit your cares away.

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The Yarn

Use a cotton or cotton-blend fine- or light-weight yarn to make these soft and absorbent projects. The pattern calls for five colors, so this is a perfect time to try out a colorful pack of mini skeins!

Basket of 5 colors of yarn ready to knit

For the cloths pictured I used Trailhead Yarns Appalachian Trail Yarn Crew mini-skeins. Appalachian Trail is 65% cotton, 35% nylon. I used about 108 yds [99 m] each of five colors to complete all six washcloths. 

Other knitters who tested the pattern had good success with Cascade Ultra Pima Fine, Ultra Pima DK, or Premier Yarns Cotton Fair.


Finished Dimensions

The finished size will vary based on the yarn and needles you use, and your particular gauge. The washcloths shown measure about 6 3/4″ [17 cm] square. 

Size is not crucial in this project, but if you substitute yarns, choose a needle size that results in a fabric that is not too dense and not too loose.

Easy Colorblock Washcloths arranged in a basket

Materials

Fine-weight yarn: approximately 40 yds [36.5 m] each of two colors (Color A & Color B) for the Team Colors cloth below.

US size 2 [3 mm] knitting needles or size to obtain appropriate gauge

Gauge

30 sts and 22 rows = 4″ [10 cm] in garter stitch in fine-weight yarn

See note above about gauge.

Instructions

Team Colors

With Color A, long-tail cast on 50 stitches.

Rows 1-23: Knit. You have 12 garter stitch ridges. Cut A.

Rows 24-75: WIth Color B, knit. You have 26 garter stitch ridges in B, Cut B.

Rows 76-99: With Color A, knit. You have 12 garter stitch ridges in A. 

Bind off. Weave in ends. 

What’s Next?

Knit: Basics & Beyond offers links to help you improve your knitting skills.

Check out these other easy knitting patterns:

My First Scarf
Easy Two-Toned Pillow
Quick & Easy Summer Placemats

How Many Foundation Chains Do I Need?

Crocheters often wonder how many foundation chains they need to result in their desired number of stitches.

How many foundation chains do I need? with photo of a crochet chain

It can be confusing! Sometimes you chain 4 more than the number of stitches you want, but other times you chain just one more. How do you figure out how many foundation chains you need?

I could tell you how many chains you need to get the number of stitches you want on the first row. You could look back to this blog post every time you want to know the answer (see below). That would be awesome for my website traffic, but not so great for helping you learn. I’d rather have you understand how to figure out for yourself how many foundation chains you need.

I’m using American crochet terminology in this article. If you are in the UK, refer to this conversion chart.

What’s on the first row?

The first thing you must know is how many stitches you want on the first row, and what type of stitches they are.

If you are designing your own project, you’ve worked a gauge swatch and done the math to figure out how many stitches you need. If you are following a pattern, you can follow the pattern instructions, or adapt it as needed.

The first stitch of the first row is crucial, because the number of foundation chains depends on the height of the first stitch of the row.

Turning Chains

Crochet stitches are created below the level of the hook. When you start a new row or round, you have to bring the hook up to that new level before working the stitches on the next row.

photo showing turning chain for double crochet
Stitches are created below the level of the crochet hook. A turning chain is the ladder that allows the hook to reach the level of the next row.

Think of the turning chain as a ladder that carries your hook up to that next level. The taller the first stitch of the row, the more steps you need to take on your ladder to reach that height. In other words, you need more turning chains for taller stitches.

The very first turning chain is part of the foundation chain. That means you have to crochet extra chains to incorporate the turning chain.

This first turning chain is created when you insert your hook into the 2nd, 3rd, or 4th (or more) chain from the hook. The skipped chains count as the turning chain.

You also need to know whether you are counting the turning chain as a stitch. In single crochet, the turning chain is usually not counted as a stitch. In half double, double, or treble crochet, the turning chain is often—but not always—counted as a stitch.

Photo showing turning chain and where first single crochet goes into a foundation chain

For more information, read Where to Put the First Stitch of a Crochet Row and How to Prevent Gaps at the Beginning of Crochet Rows.

Table showing number of turning chains for different stitches when the turning chain counts as a stitch and doesn't count as a stitch

Foundation Chains for Single Crochet

Now that you know you need one turning chain for single crochet (sc), and that turning chain is not going to count as a stitch, you can figure out how many chains you need.

Let’s say you want to end up with 10 single crochet stitches on the first row. You need one for each stitch, plus one turning chain, so you need a total of 11 chains to result in ten stitches. I think it’s easier to understand using stitch symbols.

10 sc on first row + 1 turning chain = 11 foundation chains

Crochet symbols for foundation chains and Single crochet row

Foundation Chains for Half Double Crochet

The calculation for half double crochet (hdc) will depend on whether you are using the turning chain as a stitch. When it gets a bit more complicated like this, I often sketch it out on a piece of paper to remind myself how many foundation chains I need. It makes more sense to me when I see it in a visual format like a stitch diagram.

Assume we are using a chain-2 turning chain for this half double crochet. If I want 10 hdc on the first row, and I am not counting the turning chain as a stitch, I need to add 2 chains.

10 hdc on first row + 2 turning chains = 12 foundation chains

Stitch diagram showing foundation chain when turning chain is not used as a hdc

If I want 10 hdc on the first row, and I am counting the turning chain as a stitch, I need to add 1 chain.

10 hdc on first row + 1 turning chain = 11 foundation chains

Stitch diagram showing foundation chain when turning chain is used as a hdc

Foundation Chains for Double Crochet

Double crochet is like half double crochet, in that you have to know how you are treating the turning chain, and how many chains you are using. Assume we are using a 3-chain turning chain for this double crochet.

If I want 10 dc on the first row, and I am not counting a chain-3 turning chain as a stitch, I need to add 3 chains.

10 dc on first row + 3 chains = 13 foundation chains

Stitch diagram showing foundation chain when turning chain is not used as a dc

If I want 10 dc on the first row, and I am counting a chain-3 turning chain as a stitch, I need to add 2 chains.

10 dc on first row + 2 chains = 12 foundation chains

Stitch diagram showing foundation chain when turning chain is used as a dc

Can you work out for yourself how many foundation chains you would need for treble crochet?

This post contains affiliate links which may provide a small income to me if you buy something from this page, but they don’t cost you anything extra.

Learning More

Crochet Answer Book 2nd edition by Edie Eckman cover image
The Crochet Answer Book is a classic pocket reference.

Now you understand the relationship of the foundation chain to turning chains, to the height of stitches, and to whether the turning chain is used as a stitch. And now you can figure out how many foundation chains you need in every situation!

Have more questions? Refer to The Crochet Answer Book. It has answers to questions like these, and all your crochet questions, in a handy format. It’s a compact reference that you can stick in your project bag and have ready at all times, even when you can’t get online.

You can hire me as a consultant or tech editor to help you with all your crochet needs. And I teach online and all around the country, as well!

My YouTube channel is full of video tutorials that offer the “why” as well as the “how” of crochet techniques. Subscribe to it now!


Still wishing you had table for a quick answer? Here it is:

Table showing number of crochet chains to add for different types of stitches in the first row.

Free Crochet Pattern: Easy Little Baskets

Basic crochet skills are all it takes to make these Easy Little Baskets. Looking for a good project for a new crocheter? This is it!

Using just single crochet and small amounts of yarn, you’ll be soon be turning these out by the dozen! They’ll hold your crochet hooks, pencils, paperclips, glasses, keys, or tiny treasures.

Round, Oval, and Square-to-Round shapes can be crocheted with any yarn. It’s a great way to use up odds and ends of yarn you have on hand!

This post contains affiliate links, which don’t cost you anything, but may provide a small income to me.

Instructions for the baskets are given below. You may also purchase a downloadable ad-free pdf of the pattern which includes stitch diagrams for all three baskets.

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The Yarn

You can use any medium-weight yarn you have on hand, in any colors you like. Depending on the yarn you use, you’ll be able to get several baskets out of a single skein. Use a smaller hook than you normally would with your chosen yarn, as you want to create a stiff fabric.

For the baskets pictured I used Universal Yarn Yashi, a 100% raffia tape. The raffia fiber is stiffer than regular yarn, but it adds a unique look to the crochet.

Each ball of Yashi has 1.41 oz [40 g], 99 yd [90 m]. I used 1 ball each #106 Hot Green, # 104 Super Pink and #105 Bright Aqua.

Finished Dimensions

Round: 3″ [ 7.5 cm] diameter x 3½” [9 cm] high
Oval: 6″ [15 cm] long x 3¼” [8 cm] wide x 3″ [ 7.5 cm] high
Square-to-Round: 3¾” [9.5 cm] square x 4½ ” [11.5 cm] high

The finished size will vary based on the yarn and hooks you use. Size is not important in this project.

Materials

Worsted Weight Yarn: approximately 200 yds total for all 3 baskets.

US size I-9 [5.5 mm] crochet hook for raffia fiber
US size G [4.25 mm] or H-8 [5 mm] crochet hook for acrylic or wool yarn.

Stitch marker

It’s easy crochet: you’ll use single crochet, double crochet and slip stitch.. There are no seams at all; it’s entirely one piece. Crocheters just beyond the beginner level should find this bag within their ability.

Gauge

12 sc and 16 rnds = 4″ [10 cm] with 5.5 mm hook and raffia yarn
16 sc and 18 rnds = 4″ [10 cm] with 5 mm hook and medium-weight yarn

Gauge is not crucial in this project. However, you should use a hook size that results in a slightly stiff fabric so that the basket holds its shape.

Pattern Notes

  • This pattern uses American crochet terminology.
  • Color designations are made as MC (main color) and Contrasting Color (CC) or Contrasting
  • Color 1 (CC1) and Contrasting Color 2 (CC2), because it really doesn’t matter which colors you use. Use the photos as a guide if you want to copy the colorways shown.
  • Baskets are worked in unjoined rounds. Leave at least a 4″ [10 cm] tail of yarn in order to have enough yarn to weave in ends securely.

Abbreviations

CC, CC1, CC2: contrasting color, contrasting color 1, contrasting color 2
ch: chain
MC: main color
pm: place marker
rep: repeat
rnd(s): round(s)
RS: right side
sc: single crochet
sc2tog (single crochet 2 together): [insert hook into next stitch, yarn over, pull up a loop] 2 times, yarn over and pull through all 3 loops on hook
st(s): stitch(es)

Round Basket

Easy Little Crochet Basket Round, bottom view

With MC, ch 4, join with slip st to form a ring.

Rnd 1 (RS): Ch 1 (does not count as a st), 6 sc in ring—6 sc. Pm in first st to indicate beginning of rnd and move marker up as you work each rnd.

Rnd 2: 2 sc in first st, 2 sc in each st around—12 sc.

Rnd 3: Sc in first st, 2 sc in next st, [sc in next st, 2 sc in next st] around—18 sc.

Rnd 4: 2 sc in first st, sc in next 2 sts, [2 sc in next st, sc in next 2 sts] around—24 sc.

Rnd 5: Sc in first st, sc in next 2 sts, 2 sc in next st, [sc in next 3 sts, 2 sc in next st] around—30 sc.

Rnd 6: Sc in back loop only of each st around—30 sc.

Rnds 7-16: Sc in each st around, changing to CC on last st of Rnd 16. Cut MC.

Rnds 17-18: With CC, sc in each st around.

Slip st in next st. Fasten off. Weave in ends.

Oval Basket

Easy Little Crochet Basket Oval, bottom view

Ch 9.
Rnd 1: Sc in 2nd ch from hook, sc in next 6 ch, 3 sc in last ch; continuing across the other side of the foundation chain, sc in next 6 ch, 2 sc in last ch; do not join—18 sc.
Pm in first st to indicate beginning of rnd and move marker up as you work each rnd.

Rnd 2: 2 sc in next sc, sc in next 6 sc, 2 sc in next 3 sc, sc in next 6 sc, 2 sc in last 2 sc—24 sc.

Rnd 3: Sc in next sc, 2 sc in next sc, sc in next 6 sc, [sc in next sc, 2 sc in next sc] 3 times, sc in next 6 sc, [sc in next sc, 2 sc in next sc] 2 times—30 sc.

Rnd 4: 2 sc in next sc, sc in next 2 sc, sc in next 6 sc, [2 sc in next sc, sc in next 2 sc] 3 times, sc in next 6 sc, [2 sc in next st, sc in next 2 sc] 2 times—36 sc.

Rnd 5: Sc in next 3 sc, 2 sc in next st, sc in next 6 sc, [sc in next 3 sc, 2 sc in next st] 3 times, sc in next 6 sc, [sc in next 3 sc, 2 sc in next sc] 2 times—42 sc.

Rnd 6: 2 sc in next sc, sc in next 4 sc, sc in next 6 sc, [2 sc in next sc, sc in next 4 sc] 3 times, sc in next 6 sc, [2 sc in next st, sc in next 4 sc] 2 times—48 sc.

Rnd 7: Sc in back loop of each sc around—48 sc.

Rnds 8-16: Sc in each st around, changing to CC on last st of Rnd 16.
Cut MC.

Rnds 17-18: With CC, sc in each st around.

Slip st in next st. Fasten off. Weave in ends.

Square-to-Round Basket

With MC, ch 4, join with slip st to form a ring.

Easy Little Crochet Basket Square to Round, bottom view

Rnd 1: Ch 1, 8 sc in ring; do not join—12 sc.
Pm in first st to indicate beginning of rnd and move marker up as you work each rnd.

Rnd 2: 2 sc in first sc, sc in next sc, [3 sc in next sc, sc in next sc] around, sc in same st as first sc—16 sc.

Rnd 3: 2 sc in first sc, sc in next 3 sc, [3 sc in next sc, sc in next 3 sc] around, sc in same st as first sc—24 sc.

Rnd 4: 2 sc in first sc, sc in next 5 sc, [3 sc in next sc, sc in next 5 sc] around, sc in same st as first sc—32 sc.

Rnd 5: 2 sc in first sc, sc in next 7 sc, [3 sc in next sc, sc in next 7 sc] around, sc in same st as first sc—40 sc.

Rnd 6: 2 sc in first sc, sc in next 9 sc, [3 sc in next sc, sc in next 9 sc] around, sc in same st as first sc—48 sc.

Rnd 7: Sc in back loop only of each st around—48 sc.

Rnds 8-15: Sc in each sc around.

Rnd 16: [Sc2tog, sc in next 10 sc] around—44 sc.

Rnds 17-19: Sc in each sc around.

Rnd 20: [Sc2tog, sc in next 9 sc] around—40 sc.

Rnd 21: Sc in each sc to last st; on last st, change to CC1. Cut MC.

Rnd 22: With CC1, sc in each sc around.

Rnd 23: Sc in each sc to last st; on last st, change to CC2. Cut CC1.

Rnd 24: With CC2, sc in each sc around.

Slip st in next st.

Fasten off. Weave in ends.

What’s Next?

Looking for more ways to up your crochet game? Check out Crochet: Basics & Beyond.

Primavera Lace Socks Knitting Pattern

Primavera Lace Socks Knitting Pattern designed by Edie Eckman

Put a little spring in your step with Primavera Lace Socks. This is a quick, easy knit that will go with all your spring outfits. They are lacy enough to be cool on those warm spring days yet warm enough for that occasional spring chill.

Primavera Lace Socks designed by Edie Eckman

This post contains affiliate links, which may provide a small income to me if you buy something by clicking on a link on this site. Affiliate links do not cost you anything extra.

About the Yarn

You can use any sock-weight yarn for these socks. I’ve knit them twice, with different yarns, and had great results with each.

I knit the light green socks you see above with Cascade Yarns Heritage (75% merino superwash/ 25% nylon, 3.5 oz [100 g], 437 yd [399 m]). I used 1 skein #5629 Citron and had plenty of yarn left over.

For the teal sock pictured above, I used KnitPicks Stroll Solids (75% fine superwash merino wool/ 25% nylon, 1.75 oz [50g], 231 yds [211 m]). I used 2 balls #28181 Patina for the pair. Again, with plenty of yarn left over.

About the Pattern and Construction

These are classic cuff-down socks with a heel flap and gusset. Instructions are given for both double-pointed needles and the Magic Loop method, but of course you can adapt that to the two-circular method if that is your preference.

These socks work up beautifully, using either text or chart instructions for the lace rib pattern. The pattern is easily memorized for faster knitting, and there is a video tutorial for the Magic Loop method.

Happy Knitting!

Want to learn to knit socks using the Magic Loop method? Check out my Twisted Ribs Socks class on Creativebug.

Looking for more sock patterns? Check out my Rebecca Socks.

How to Crochet a Granny Square

The granny square is the most common motif in crochet. Almost everybody recognizes a granny square! Even beginning crocheters can learn to crochet a granny square.

Granny squares are useful and versatile. They can be crocheted in any yarn . They can be dressed up or down, and they can be combined in so many different ways.

Granny squares are relaxing to crochet because the concept is so easy. The hook goes into spaces, not stitches, so once you get the feel of it, you can almost crochet without looking.

Follow these steps,and watch the video tutorial to crochet a classic granny square. I’m using American crochet terminology in this post. This post contains affiliate links.

What is a Granny Square?

Although a lot of people use the term “granny square” to refer to any type of crocheted square, a true granny square is a specific type of crocheted motif.

A classic granny square is crocheted from the center out. It consists of groups of three double crochet stitches, separated by chain spaces. All of the stitches are worked into chain spaces, not into the tops of stitches.

How to Crochet Granny square with helpful labels

They can be crocheted in one color, but are most often seen in multiple colors. It’s a great way to use up small amounts of different colored yarns!

There are lots of granny square variations. What follows is a classic Granny Square with chain-1 spaces between the stitch groups, and a combination of chain-3 and chain-2 corner spaces.

Tips & Tricks

Many granny square instructions have you join new colors and start new rounds with a chain-3 build-up chain at the beginning of the round. I don’t like the way that looks, so in these instructions I’ve added the refinement of using a standing double crochet to start each new color.

If you understand the construction of a granny square, you can make them without a pattern. Basically, you are putting 3 double crochets into each chain-1 space, (3 double crochet, ch 2, 3 double crochet) into each corner space, and you are using a chain 1 to bridge the gap over each 3-double crochet group.

Don’t worry-that will make more sense once you’ve crocheted one! Be sure to watch the video below for more tips.

A printable ad-free copy of this pattern is available to subscribers to my newsletter. Click on the button to subscribe and get the pattern.

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Granny Square Instructions

Abbreviations

A, B, C: yarn colors
ch: chain
dc: double crochet
rep: repeat
rnd(s): round(s)
st(s): stitch(es)
standing dc (standing double crochet): beginning with a slip knot on the hook, work a double crochet into the space indicated

Materials

Any yarn and any hook appropriate for your yarn

This granny square uses three different colors but you can make your granny square with any number of colors.

Instructions

With A, ch 4, join with slip st to form a ring.

Rnd 1: Ch 3 (counts as dc), 2 dc in ring, ch 2, [3 dc in ring, ch 3] 3 times, join with slip st to top of beginning ch-3. Fasten off. You have 4 3-dc groups and 4 corner spaces.

Rnd 2: With B, standing dc in any corner space, [2 dc, ch 2, 3 dc] in same corner space, ch 1, *[3 dc, ch 2, 3 dc] in next ch-space, ch 1; rep from * around, join with slip st to top of first dc. Fasten off. You have 8 3-dc groups, 4 corner spaces, and 4 ch-1 spaces.

Rnd 3: With C, [standing dc, 2 dc, ch 2, 3 dc] in any corner space, *ch 1, 3 dc in next space, ch 1**, [3 dc, ch 2, 3 dc] in next space; rep from * around, ending last rep at **, join with slip st to first dc. Fasten off. You have 12 3-dc groups, 4 corner spaces, and 8 ch-1 spaces.

Rnd 4: With A, [standing dc, 2 dc, ch 2, 3 dc] in any corner space, *ch 1, [3 dc in next space, ch 1] in each space to corner space**, [3 dc, ch 2, 3 dc] in corner space; rep from * around, ending last rep at **, join with slip st to first dc. Fasten off. You have 4 corner spaces, 4 additional 3-dc groups, and 4 additional ch-1 spaces.

To make the granny square larger, repeat Rnd 4, changing colors as desired.

If your granny square starts to look off-kilter, read Skewing Grannies. For a fun variation on the classic granny square, try a Tower Stitch Granny.

Watch the Video for More Information

In this video, I show you how to crochet the granny square I just described.

Note that on Round 3, I start the round in the middle of a side (in a chain-1 space), rather than in the corner as the written instructions show. This is just to demonstrate that you can start the round anywhere at all, as long as you understand granny construction!