Review & Giveaway: Crochet Animal Rugs

Crochet Animal Rugs by Ira Rott coverThis post contains affiliate links which help support this site but do not cost you anything.

In Crochet Animal Rugs by Ira Rott, the focus is on cute. Seven animal themes vie for your attention in this collection of home dec patterns for kids.

About the Designs

Jeffery the Elephant, Rusty the Giraffe, Sassy the Kitty Cat, Rock ‘n’ Roll Panda, Chip the Monkey, Cranky the Crab, and Tops the Dinosaur are all here. There’s a rug for each animal (of course), but the book title is misleading because there’s a lot more than just rugs here.


Tops the Dinosaur Pillow Crochet Animal Rugs by Ira RottThere are matching items to go with each rug, so you can complete your chosen décor with a pillow, toy bag, security blanket, or other item.

The crocheting itself just basic stitches worked in simple shapes. It’s the way these pieces are combined that makes each design unique. Skill levels are given for each project, so you can choose an easier one if you are a novice, or choose a more complex one if you are adventurous. Lefties will find specific instructions on how to adapt the patterns for left-handed crochet.

All the projects are made using worsted weight yarn, although some projects require holding multiple strands of yarn together. Although specific yarns and color names are not called for in each pattern, the list of supplies at the back of the book credits Bernat Super Value Yarn and Red Heart Super Saver. These and other readily available plain, washable, worsted-weight yarns are just what you need. You probably even have some leftovers that you can use for bits and pieces of eyes, ears, and so on.


Chart example Crochet Animal Rugs by Ira Rott

Crochet Animal Rugs Has Charts!

With clothes, we want pockets. With crochet, we want charts. Along with text instructions, the book has stitch charts every time you need one, and often even when you don’t!

Monkey Pillow Step Out Crochet Animal Rugs by Ira Rott

Attention to Detail

It can be intimidating to ponder all the finishing that has to be done on projects like these, but where Ira really shines is in her absolute attention to detail, especially with finishing instructions. I can’t say enough good things about the up-close, in-progress photos that show each assembly step. They have arrows that show the direction of the work, and labels where necessary to make things crystal-clear.


Monkey Pillow Step Out Crochet Animal Rugs by Ira Rott

Behind-the-Scenes Knowledge

Now it’s time for a bit of a confession: Although I didn’t work on this book, I have worked as a tech editor on some of Ira’s other patterns. I have been floored at the clarity of her pattern writing and graphic design skills. I wish all crochet designers (myself included) could produce such great patterns. Ira uses testers as well as technical editors for her patterns, and takes the testers’ feedback into consideration before publishing a pattern. You are in great hands with Ira’s Crochet Animal Rugs

Giveaway

The Giveaway has ended. Congratulations to winner Karen C!


Ira Rott photo

About Ira

Ira Rott is a knit and crochet designer living in Canada. Looking for other cute designs from Ira? You can find her at IraRott.com and find finished items from the book on Instagram #CrochetAnimalRugs.

Larcenous Knitting Rhymes and Other Poetry

Knit Rhyme 1Many knitters recognize this children’s rhyme as the way to make a knit stitch, but have you ever considered that it could also describe a crime?

Neither had Jennifer Hoyden, a knitting teacher at a shelter for homeless families in New York City. She was shocked when her students told her it sounded like a teaching tool for burglary. Wow! As a teacher, I know that I need to adapt my message to fit the needs of my audience, but that’s a tough crowd!
Knit Rhyme 3This got me thinking of rhymes that we use to teach the basic knitting stitches. There are quite a few of them, yet there is some disagreement about which are most descriptive of knit stitches and purl stitches. For example, some people consider the “bunny hole” rhyme a description of purling, while to me it sounds like another knit rhyme.

 


Generic rhymesYet these two seem to describe purling, but could be used for either knit or purl.

Knit rhyme 2While it’s nice to have these mneumonic rhymes at our fingertips (at the tip of our tongues?), when the unexpected happens, teachers have to adapt quickly. Here’s the new rhyme that Jennifer made up on the spot to replace the one about that sneaky Jack.

How’s that for fast thinking? And it encourages cleanliness instead of larceny!

What’s your favorite rhyme for teaching beginners, young and old?

 

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Photos by Pezibear on Pixabay. Used under Creative Commons CC0.