Free Knitting Pattern: Slip Stitch Pillow

Slip Stitch Pillow by Edie Eckman

A chunky knit pillow with a minimalist modern look! The knitting pattern is free, and the Slip Stitch Pillow will look fantastic on your sofa. It makes a great gift for all home decor styles.

Slip stitch ribs on a background of garter stitch makes for super easy knitting. Even novice knitters can master this stitch pattern.

photo of pillow and basket of yarn on sofa

The free knitting pattern and video tutorial is below. You can also purchase a printable ad-free pdf.

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Thanks to Lion Brand Yarn and Fairfield Products for providing the materials for this project. This post contains affiliate links, which may provide a small income to me, but don’t cost you anything extra.

About the Materials

6 Super Bulky logo

The pillow takes about 212 yards [194 m] of super bulky yarn. The pillow pictured is knit with two balls of Lion Brand Wool-Ease Thick & Quick (80% acrylic, 20% wool) in color 099 Fisherman. I used US size 13 [9 mm] knitting needles to get gauge.

You’ll need a 14″ [35.5 cm] square pillow form. I used Fairfield Products Poly-fil Premier Ultra Plus Pillow Insert.

Fairfield Products Poly-fil Premier ultra plush pillow insert

Free Pattern: Slip Stitch Pillow

Slip Stitch Pillow flat lay

Finished Dimensions

14″ [35.5 cm] square

Materials

Super-bulky weight yarn: approximately 212 yds [27 m]. Sample used Lion Brand Wool-Ease Thick & Quick (80% acrylic, 20% wool, 6 oz [170 g], 106 yd [97 m]), 2 balls 099 Fisherman

US size 13 [9 mm] knitting needles or size to obtain correct gauge

Size M/N [9 mm] crochet hook for finishing (optional)

14″ [35.5 cm] square pillow form

Tapestry needle

Gauge

11 sts and 20 rows = 4″ [10 cm] in Slip Stitch Pattern
To save time, take time to check gauge.

Abbreviations

k: knit
p: purl
rep: repeat
RS: right side
sl: slip
st(s): stitch(es)
WS: wrong side
wyib: with yarn in back

Slip Stitch Pattern

Multiple of 4 + 3
Set-Up Row (WS): K3, [p1, k3] across.
Row 1 (RS): K3, [sl 1 purlwise wyib, k3] across.
Row 2: K3, [p1, k3] across.
Rep Rows 1 and 2 for pattern.

Instructions

(Make 2)
Long tail cast on 35 sts.

Work in Slip Stitch Pattern until piece measures 13″ [33 cm] from beginning, ending with a WS row. Bind off knitwise.

Weave in ends.

Finishing

Crochet seam (optional): Holding front and back pieces with WS together, single crochet evenly through both layers around to seam three sides. Insert pillow form before closing fourth side. Weave in ends.

If you prefer, sew front and back together on three sides; insert pillow form before finishing final seam.

Weave in ends.

https://youtu.be/q3GQ80Fr3o4

More Easy Knitting Projects

Looking for more free and easy knitting patterns? Check these out:

What Does “Work Even” Mean?

What Does "Work Even" Mean?

Knitting and crochet patterns often say work even. What does “work even” mean? What about work even in pattern, or continue in pattern?

What Does "Work Even" Mean?

Learn what work even means and why it’s such a useful term to know.  

 

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This post contains affiliate links, which may pay me a small income if you buy something. They don’t cost you anything extra.

Work Even Defined

In a knitting or crochet pattern, work even simply means “keep doing whatever you’ve been doing without increasing or decreasing”.

If you’ve been increasing, for example on a top-down hat, stop increasing and continue working on a constant number of stitches.

In this example of a crocheted top-down hat, the first five rounds have been increase rounds, but in Round 6, you stop increasing and start “working even” on 40 half double crochet stitches.

Rnd 5: Ch 1, hdc in same st and in next 2 sts, 2 hdc in next st, [hdc in next 3 sts, 2 hdc in next st] around, join with slip st to top of first hdc—40 hdc.
Rnd 6: Work even.

crocheted circle with increase rounds followed by a non-increase round

An alternative wording to this Round 6 might be:

Rnd 6: Ch 1, hdc in each hdc around, join with slip st to top of first hdc—40 hdc.

If you’ve been decreasing, stop decreasing and continue working on a constant number of stitches. Here’s a knitting example:

Rows 1, 3 and 5 (RS): K1, ssk, knit to last 3 sts, k2tog, k1—2 sts decreased.
Rows 2, 4 and 6: Purl.
Rows 7-10: Work even.

knitted swatch with a decrease section followed by a non-decreased section

An alternative wording here might be:

Rows 7 and 9: Knit.
Rows 8 and 10: Purl.

OR

Continue working in stockinette stitch without increasing.

Work in Pattern

Whether you’ve been increasing or decreasing, when you begin to work even, continue working in whatever pattern you were doing during the shaping.

    • If you were knitting stockinette stitch, continue knitting stockinette stitch.
    • If you were working double crochet, continue working double crochet.
    • If you were doing a fancy stitch pattern, continue doing that same stitch pattern, adjusting the edge stitches as necessary to maintain the pattern without interruption.

Sometimes patterns will say work even in pattern or continue in pattern. These mean the same thing. If the instructions don’t specify “in pattern”, but simply say “work even”, the “in pattern” is assumed.

Continue in (established) pattern is also used without meaning “work even”. In that case, it means that you should maintain the stitch pattern as established while the shaping takes place.

For example, after describing how to do a decrease, the instructions for the the Right Front armhole shaping on a crocheted sweater might say:

Continuing in pattern, decrease 1 st at armhole edge every row 2 (2, 2, 3, 2, 2, 3, 4) times – 34 (35, 38, 40, 41, 42, 42, 44) sts remain.
Work even until Right Front measures 3½ (4, 4¼, 4¾, 5, 5½, 6, 6½)” [9 (10, 11, 12, 12.5, 14, 15, 16.5) cm] from bottom of armhole, ending with a WS row.

Right Front sweater schematic with straight and decrease sections

After defining the particular stitch pattern used in a sweater, instructions for a sleeve might say:

Cast on 35 (36, 37) sts. Work even in pattern for 2″ [5 cm], ending with a RS row.
Next row (Inc Rnd, RS): K1, m1, work in pattern to 3 sts, m1, k1—2 sts increased.
Continue in pattern for 15 (13, 11) rows.

Repeat these 16 (14, 12) rows 3 (4, 5) more times—43 (46, 49) sts.
Work even until sleeve measures 7.25 (7.75, 8.5)” [18.5 (19.6, 21.5) cm].
Bind off.

sleeve schematic with straight and increase sections

Combined With Shaping

While the examples above show work even used after a shaping section, it can also be used to indicate how often to work shaping.

A crochet pattern might say:

Next Row (Decrease Row:) Ch 1, sc in first st, sc2tog, sc in each st to last 2 sts, sc2tog, sc in last st, turn—2 sts decreased.
Work even 3 rows.
Repeat these 4 rows 5 times.

A knitting pattern might say:

Next Rnd (Increase Rnd:) K1, yo, knit to last st, yo, k1—2 sts increased..
Work even 3 rnds.
Repeat these 4 rnds 5 times.

Work Evenly

Sticklers for grammar (and I am one) might be tempted to write “work evenly”. After all, work is a verb, and evenly is the adverb that would  modify work. Resist that temptation!

Work even is the industry term, or term of art, that we use to mean “keep going without changing stitch count”, while work evenly would mean “keep your stitches the same size”.

Work evenly would always be assumed, don’t you think?

work even definition

Why Do Instructions Use It?

So why do instructions use the term work even, rather than spelling out row-by-row instructions?

The term is a kind of pattern shorthand, in the same way that there are shorthand terms in recipes. The examples above are simple ones, but there are times in more complex patterns where spelling out every row or round would be cumbersome.

If your recipe says “beat eggs”, you understand that means to lightly mix the eggs and eggs yolks together. Unless you are a brand-new cook, you wouldn’t expect the recipe to say “lightly mix eggs and egg yolks together”. If all recipes spelled out instructions that much they would be too long!

In the same way, it can be shorter for pattern designers to write work even than to spell out each row or round.

And now that you know what work even means, you’ll be able to tackle those pattern instructions with confidence!

Want to learn more about knitting and crochet terminology? Check out Knit: Basics & Beyond and Crochet: Basics & Beyond.

 

 

 

How to Become a Crochet Designer

How to Become a Crochet Designer

You enjoy creating new designs instead of relying on other people’s patterns. Your friends want to make the items you’re designing. How do you become a crochet designer?

There’s a lot to learn, but you’ve got to start somewhere. Here are my ten best tips for becoming a crochet designer.

This post contains affiliate links.

Tip #1 Crochet, crochet, crochet

Crochet, crochet, crochet

Crochet a lot. Crochet many different types of things: hats, scarfs, afghans, pillows, amigurumi, shawls and sweaters. Crochet items where gauge matters so that you understand how important gauge is. Crochet sweaters for women, for men, and for children so that you understand ease and fit.

Pay attention to the techniques you use and try to understand the “why” behind what you are doing. You may learn that you don’t enjoy crocheting a specific type of project or with a certain type of yarn. Or you may find new favorites!

The more you crochet and the more varied your projects are, the faster you will learn the designer skills.


Tip #2 Learn from Others

Learn from Others

Study what other crochet designers have done, and see what techniques they use.

As you learn new techniques, make sure you’re learning from reputable sources. Blog posts and videos made years ago may have a lot of views. This makes them show up at the top of a list when you do a search. And they may be at the top of the list because they are useful and answer your questions.

Yet not every post or video you’ll see will be accurate. It may be that things have changed recently and new terminology has come into fashion. There may be more than one “right” way of doing something. The information given may not cover the whole story.

Take time to look at many sources for information. Learning from books, blogs, and videos will increase your knowledge. Books like Design Your Own Crochet Projects by Sara Delaney can speed you on your way.

Take classes to up your skill level. Many in-person classes are on hold right now, but they are an excellent way to build your skills. Bloggers and teachers who teach at national shows such as the CGOA’s Chain Link or Stitches events are a good place to start.

You can see all my available classes here.

And of course, there are thousands of YouTube videos to choose from. Subscribe to my YouTube channel for lots of crochet instruction.


Tip #3 Swatch, swatch, swatch

Swatch, Swatch, Swatch

swatch of crocheted fabric

Swatching is the process of making a small sample of fabric using the yarn, hook, and stitch pattern(s) you’ll use in a project.

Most people think of swatching as a chore they have to do to match a pattern gauge. But swatching is much more than that! It’s a crucial tool for designers.

Swatching allows you to try out ideas before you commit to making an entire project. If you have a problem with the yarn or hook, or don’t like the stitch pattern, it’s better to find that out early on. Why wait until the middle of the project to find out you don’t like it?

Swatching allows you to get a feel for the fabric you are making. You can decide if that fabric behaves the way you want it to for your project. Play with combinations of hook, yarn and stitch pattern to get the exact fabric you want.

Crocheting is forgiving of experimentation, and that’s what swatching is all about. And yes, a good swatch also gives you important information about gauge.

Watch How to Measure Gauge in Single Crochet.


Tip #4 Make Friends with Stitch Dictionaries

Make Friends with Stitch Dictionaries

While we are on the topic of experimenting, grab a stitch dictionary or three and try out different stitch patterns. Add stitch patterns to your design toolbox!

Try out a variety of patterns, hooks, yarns, and projects. This kind of play (it’s called swatching!) allows your creative juices to start flowing.

Here are some great places to start with stitch dictionaries:


Tip #5 Understand the Math

Understand the Math

Designing for crochet is all about math. You are going to be using arithmetic in all your crochet designs, whether you realize it or not.

Knowing how gauge factors into everything is a start, but there is a lot more to know. You will save huge amounts of time, and lots of trial and error, if you take the time to learn the math behind the crochet.

Understanding the math ensures that your projects will turn out to be the size and proportions you intend. Don’t be scared! We are talking 4th-grade level calculations, and calculators are allowed! Learn more in my Math for Crocheters class.


Tip #6 Prepare a Professional Pattern

Prepare a Professional Pattern

Have you ever felt discouraged trying to read a crochet pattern? An incomplete or poorly written pattern can make you throw your hook in the air with frustration!

Crocheters are more likely to trust you and want to make your patterns if they are easy to read and understand. Publishers and editors love designers who can compose well-written patterns.

Save yourself time and effort by coming up with a designing system. Develop your idea, make the project, and write the pattern in one integrated, seamless workflow.

Crochet Pattern Writing Workshop graphic

In my online course Crochet Pattern Writing Workshop, you’ll start to create this type of workflow. You’ll develop a style guide so your patterns are consistently formatted. You’ll learn to write clear instructions. Improve the overall quality of your patterns for a more professional presentation.



Tip #7 Use a Tech Editor

Use a Tech Editor

A technical editor, or tech editor, checks your pattern between when you design it and when you publish it. They ensure that all of your math checks out and that you haven’t left out crucial instructions. A tech editor is a crucial step in presenting accurate, well-written patterns.

For more about tech editors, read Working with a Technical Editor.

Want to hire me as your tech editor? I’d love to help you become a better crochet designer!


Tip #8: Style Your Photos

Style Your Photos

Easy Little Baskets photograph
Easy Little Baskets

Think about how you’ll be taking photos. Don’t just take a picture of your project on the kitchen table with mess in the background. Use natural light whenever possible, and the best camera you have available. (Maybe you need to borrow a family member’s phone!)

Putting other items in the picture with the project to style it makes the photo more interesting and memorable, and encourages people to click on your pattern.

For more on this topic, read Show and Tell: Photographing Handmade Textiles.



Tip #9 Publish Online

Publish Online

Anybody can be a published designer when you publish online!

Put patterns up on your blog or on pattern sites such as Ravelry, Etsy, or AllFreeCrochet.

Many crocheters expect patterns to come as downloadable and printable PDFs, not as pamphlets from their local stores. Make sure that those who find your patterns are able to find you and any other patterns you may have. Include your email address or website on each pattern.


Tip #10 Promote Your Patterns

Promote Your Patterns on Social Media

megaphone graphic

Let your friends and family know about your pattern, and encourage them to share it. Your cousin who doesn’t crochet may have a best friend who is looking for their next pattern.

Use those beautifully-styled photos you took! Broadcast your news on all the channels you can think of: Instagram, Facebook, Pinterest, Twitter. Consider making a promotional video for YouTube or other video platforms. Tell the world about your awesome design!

For more information on promoting your patterns, read my interview with Marie Segares, AKA Underground Crafter, and author of Design It, Promote It, Sell It.

More Resources

There’s so much to learn about becoming a crochet designer! Check out Knit & Crochet Design Resources for some helpful links.

Do you have questions about crochet design? Ask them in the comments below.

How Many Foundation Chains Do I Need?

Crocheters often wonder how many foundation chains they need to result in their desired number of stitches.

How many foundation chains do I need? with photo of a crochet chain

It can be confusing! Sometimes you chain 4 more than the number of stitches you want, but other times you chain just one more. How do you figure out how many foundation chains you need?

I could tell you how many chains you need to get the number of stitches you want on the first row. You could look back to this blog post every time you want to know the answer (see below). That would be awesome for my website traffic, but not so great for helping you learn. I’d rather have you understand how to figure out for yourself how many foundation chains you need.

I’m using American crochet terminology in this article. If you are in the UK, refer to this conversion chart.

What’s on the first row?

The first thing you must know is how many stitches you want on the first row, and what type of stitches they are.

If you are designing your own project, you’ve worked a gauge swatch and done the math to figure out how many stitches you need. If you are following a pattern, you can follow the pattern instructions, or adapt it as needed.

The first stitch of the first row is crucial, because the number of foundation chains depends on the height of the first stitch of the row.

Turning Chains

Crochet stitches are created below the level of the hook. When you start a new row or round, you have to bring the hook up to that new level before working the stitches on the next row.

photo showing turning chain for double crochet
Stitches are created below the level of the crochet hook. A turning chain is the ladder that allows the hook to reach the level of the next row.

Think of the turning chain as a ladder that carries your hook up to that next level. The taller the first stitch of the row, the more steps you need to take on your ladder to reach that height. In other words, you need more turning chains for taller stitches.

The very first turning chain is part of the foundation chain. That means you have to crochet extra chains to incorporate the turning chain.

This first turning chain is created when you insert your hook into the 2nd, 3rd, or 4th (or more) chain from the hook. The skipped chains count as the turning chain.

You also need to know whether you are counting the turning chain as a stitch. In single crochet, the turning chain is usually not counted as a stitch. In half double, double, or treble crochet, the turning chain is often—but not always—counted as a stitch.

Photo showing turning chain and where first single crochet goes into a foundation chain

For more information, read Where to Put the First Stitch of a Crochet Row and How to Prevent Gaps at the Beginning of Crochet Rows.

Table showing number of turning chains for different stitches when the turning chain counts as a stitch and doesn't count as a stitch

Foundation Chains for Single Crochet

Now that you know you need one turning chain for single crochet (sc), and that turning chain is not going to count as a stitch, you can figure out how many chains you need.

Let’s say you want to end up with 10 single crochet stitches on the first row. You need one for each stitch, plus one turning chain, so you need a total of 11 chains to result in ten stitches. I think it’s easier to understand using stitch symbols.

10 sc on first row + 1 turning chain = 11 foundation chains

Crochet symbols for foundation chains and Single crochet row

Foundation Chains for Half Double Crochet

The calculation for half double crochet (hdc) will depend on whether you are using the turning chain as a stitch. When it gets a bit more complicated like this, I often sketch it out on a piece of paper to remind myself how many foundation chains I need. It makes more sense to me when I see it in a visual format like a stitch diagram.

Assume we are using a chain-2 turning chain for this half double crochet. If I want 10 hdc on the first row, and I am not counting the turning chain as a stitch, I need to add 2 chains.

10 hdc on first row + 2 turning chains = 12 foundation chains

Stitch diagram showing foundation chain when turning chain is not used as a hdc

If I want 10 hdc on the first row, and I am counting the turning chain as a stitch, I need to add 1 chain.

10 hdc on first row + 1 turning chain = 11 foundation chains

Stitch diagram showing foundation chain when turning chain is used as a hdc

Foundation Chains for Double Crochet

Double crochet is like half double crochet, in that you have to know how you are treating the turning chain, and how many chains you are using. Assume we are using a 3-chain turning chain for this double crochet.

If I want 10 dc on the first row, and I am not counting a chain-3 turning chain as a stitch, I need to add 3 chains.

10 dc on first row + 3 chains = 13 foundation chains

Stitch diagram showing foundation chain when turning chain is not used as a dc

If I want 10 dc on the first row, and I am counting a chain-3 turning chain as a stitch, I need to add 2 chains.

10 dc on first row + 2 chains = 12 foundation chains

Stitch diagram showing foundation chain when turning chain is used as a dc

Can you work out for yourself how many foundation chains you would need for treble crochet?

This post contains affiliate links which may provide a small income to me if you buy something from this page, but they don’t cost you anything extra.

Learning More

Crochet Answer Book 2nd edition by Edie Eckman cover image
The Crochet Answer Book is a classic pocket reference.

Now you understand the relationship of the foundation chain to turning chains, to the height of stitches, and to whether the turning chain is used as a stitch. And now you can figure out how many foundation chains you need in every situation!

Have more questions? Refer to The Crochet Answer Book. It has answers to questions like these, and all your crochet questions, in a handy format. It’s a compact reference that you can stick in your project bag and have ready at all times, even when you can’t get online.

You can hire me as a consultant or tech editor to help you with all your crochet needs. And I teach online and all around the country, as well!

My YouTube channel is full of video tutorials that offer the “why” as well as the “how” of crochet techniques. Subscribe to it now!


Still wishing you had table for a quick answer? Here it is:

Table showing number of crochet chains to add for different types of stitches in the first row.

Primavera Lace Socks Knitting Pattern

Primavera Lace Socks Knitting Pattern designed by Edie Eckman

Put a little spring in your step with Primavera Lace Socks. This is a quick, easy knit that will go with all your spring outfits. They are lacy enough to be cool on those warm spring days yet warm enough for that occasional spring chill.

Primavera Lace Socks designed by Edie Eckman

This post contains affiliate links, which may provide a small income to me if you buy something by clicking on a link on this site. Affiliate links do not cost you anything extra.

About the Yarn

You can use any sock-weight yarn for these socks. I’ve knit them twice, with different yarns, and had great results with each.

I knit the light green socks you see above with Cascade Yarns Heritage (75% merino superwash/ 25% nylon, 3.5 oz [100 g], 437 yd [399 m]). I used 1 skein #5629 Citron and had plenty of yarn left over.

For the teal sock pictured above, I used KnitPicks Stroll Solids (75% fine superwash merino wool/ 25% nylon, 1.75 oz [50g], 231 yds [211 m]). I used 2 balls #28181 Patina for the pair. Again, with plenty of yarn left over.

About the Pattern and Construction

These are classic cuff-down socks with a heel flap and gusset. Instructions are given for both double-pointed needles and the Magic Loop method, but of course you can adapt that to the two-circular method if that is your preference.

These socks work up beautifully, using either text or chart instructions for the lace rib pattern. The pattern is easily memorized for faster knitting, and there is a video tutorial for the Magic Loop method.

Happy Knitting!

Want to learn to knit socks using the Magic Loop method? Check out my Twisted Ribs Socks class on Creativebug.

Looking for more sock patterns? Check out my Rebecca Socks.

Crochet a Grass Mat

Crocheted Grass Circle with Loop Stitch or Fur Stitch

Tired of that messy plastic grass in your Spring decorations? Wish you had some eco-friendly faux grass that you can use season after season? Crochet your own!

This crocheted “grass” circle can be made any size, with any yarn you have on hand. Use it to line an Easter basket or as a Spring centerpiece with your favorite flowers!

The loop stitch technique is based on single crochet. Watch the video for a tutorial on How to Crochet Loop Stitch (also known as Fur Stitch). I’ll show you three different variations, so you can choose.

This post contains affiliate links.

About the Yarn

Use any yarn you choose, with a hook in an appropriate size for your yarn. The Grass Circle pictured used one ball of Lion Brand Vanna’s Choice color 172 Kelly Green (100% acrylic, 3.5 oz [100 g], 170 yd [156 m]) .

Craft Yarn Council Icon for 4 Medium Weight Yarn

About the Construction

The mat is worked in the round from the center out in continuous, un-joined rounds. Every other round is worked using the loop stitch single crochet technique.

Instructions for the Grass Circle are given below. A print-friendly, ad-free version includes instructions and charts.

Grass Circle Mat Pattern

Size & Finished Dimensions

Can be made to any size. The sample pictured measures 14″ [35.5 cm] diameter.

Materials

Worsted weight yarn (or any size yarn desired), approximately 170 yd [156 m] to make a 14″ diameter circle

Size I-9 [5.5 mm] crochet hook, or size needed to create a nice fabric for your yarn

Stitch marker

Gauge

Rnds 1-7= 4″ [ 10 cm]

Gauge is not crucial in this pattern.

Abbreviations & Special Stitches

ch: chain
Lsc (Loop single crochet): Hold working yarn so that it is coming from back to front over left index finger (right index finger for left-handed crocheters). Hold this finger approximately 1″ [2.5 cm] from the hook. Insert hook into next stitch, then move the hook clockwise (counterclockwise for left-handed crocheters) so that it comes over the front of the working yarn; yarn over with the strand of yarn that is coming from the back of the index finger; keeping index finger in place, pull up a loop, yarn over and pull through both loops on the hook to complete a single crochet. Remove index finger from loop.
rep: repeat
rnd(s): round(s)
sc: single crochet
st(s): stitch(es)

Pattern Notes

Do not join at end of rounds.

Instructions

Rnd 1: Ch 1 (does not count as a st), 6 sc in ring—6 sts. Place marker in first st to indicate beginning of rnd and move marker up as you work each rnd.

Rnd 2: 2 Lsc in first st, 2 Lsc in each st around—12 sts.

Rnd 3: Sc in first st, 2 sc in next st, [sc in next st, 2 sc in next st] around—18 sts.

Rnd 4: 2 Lsc in first st, Lsc in next 2 sts, [2 Lsc in next st, Lsc in next 2 sts] around—24 sts.

Rnd 5: Sc in first st, sc in next 2 sts, 2 sc in next st, [sc in next 3 sts, 2 sc in next st] around—30 sts.

Rnd 6: 2 Lsc in first st, Lsc in next 4 sts, [2 Lsc in next st, Lsc in next 4 sts] around—36 sts.

Rnd 7: Sc in first st, sc in next 4 sts, 2 sc in next st, [sc in next 5 sts, 2 sc in next st] around—42 sts

Rnd 8: 2 Lsc in first st, Lsc in next 6 sts, [2 Lsc in next st, Lsc in next 6 sts] around—48 sts.

Rnd 9: Sc in first st, sc in next 6 sts, 2 sc in next st, [sc in next 7 sts, 2 sc in next st] around—54 sts.

Continue in this manner to increase 6 stitches every round until piece is as large as desired, ending with an odd-numbered round. Weave in ends.

For more detailed instructions for Rounds 1-23, plus a stitch chart, buy the ad-free printable pattern.

What will you use your “grass” for? Share photos on my Instagram feed, using #edieeckman!